guardwatch

motherjones:

 Chart: The “black triangle” of coal strangling Beijing.

motherjones:

Chart: The “black triangle” of coal strangling Beijing.

haberdashmen:

RRL

Now at Haberdash EDC.

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Shot by Grant Legan

LIES Volume I PDFs

liesjournal:

Until our regular website is back up, you can download a free PDF version of LIES Volume I here:

Single page (best for reading on computers/tablets)
Imposed (best for printing in zine/book format)
LIES Volume I PDFs

liesjournal:

Until our regular website is back up, you can download a free PDF version of LIES Volume I here:

Single page (best for reading on computers/tablets)
Imposed (best for printing in zine/book format)
atlanticinfocus:

From A Trip Across the Solar System, one of 34 photos. Here, a view of the Sun on March 7, 2012, seen in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Looping lines reveal solar plasma that is rising and falling along magnetic field lines in the solar atmosphere, or corona. The brighter prominence at upper left is named solar active region 1429, which has already released several large solar flares, some accompanied by large explosions of solar plasma known as coronal mass ejections. (NASA/SDO)

atlanticinfocus:

From A Trip Across the Solar System, one of 34 photos. Here, a view of the Sun on March 7, 2012, seen in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Looping lines reveal solar plasma that is rising and falling along magnetic field lines in the solar atmosphere, or corona. The brighter prominence at upper left is named solar active region 1429, which has already released several large solar flares, some accompanied by large explosions of solar plasma known as coronal mass ejections. (NASA/SDO)

theatlantic:

atlanticinfocus:

From A Trip Across the Solar System, one of 34 photos. Here, a view of the Sun on March 7, 2012, seen in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Looping lines reveal solar plasma that is rising and falling along magnetic field lines in the solar atmosphere, or corona. The brighter prominence at upper left is named solar active region 1429, which has already released several large solar flares, some accompanied by large explosions of solar plasma known as coronal mass ejections. (NASA/SDO)

In Focus, our news photography blog, is on Tumblr. Instafollow!

theatlantic:

atlanticinfocus:

From A Trip Across the Solar System, one of 34 photos. Here, a view of the Sun on March 7, 2012, seen in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Looping lines reveal solar plasma that is rising and falling along magnetic field lines in the solar atmosphere, or corona. The brighter prominence at upper left is named solar active region 1429, which has already released several large solar flares, some accompanied by large explosions of solar plasma known as coronal mass ejections. (NASA/SDO)

In Focus, our news photography blog, is on Tumblr. Instafollow!

theatlantic:

atlanticinfocus:

From A Trip Across the Solar System, one of 34 photos. Here, a view of the Sun on March 7, 2012, seen in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Looping lines reveal solar plasma that is rising and falling along magnetic field lines in the solar atmosphere, or corona. The brighter prominence at upper left is named solar active region 1429, which has already released several large solar flares, some accompanied by large explosions of solar plasma known as coronal mass ejections. (NASA/SDO)

In Focus, our news photography blog, is on Tumblr. Instafollow!

theatlantic:

atlanticinfocus:

From A Trip Across the Solar System, one of 34 photos. Here, a view of the Sun on March 7, 2012, seen in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Looping lines reveal solar plasma that is rising and falling along magnetic field lines in the solar atmosphere, or corona. The brighter prominence at upper left is named solar active region 1429, which has already released several large solar flares, some accompanied by large explosions of solar plasma known as coronal mass ejections. (NASA/SDO)

In Focus, our news photography blog, is on Tumblr. Instafollow!

theatlantic:

atlanticinfocus:

From A Trip Across the Solar System, one of 34 photos. Here, a view of the Sun on March 7, 2012, seen in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Looping lines reveal solar plasma that is rising and falling along magnetic field lines in the solar atmosphere, or corona. The brighter prominence at upper left is named solar active region 1429, which has already released several large solar flares, some accompanied by large explosions of solar plasma known as coronal mass ejections. (NASA/SDO)

In Focus, our news photography blog, is on Tumblr. Instafollow!

theatlantic:

atlanticinfocus:

From A Trip Across the Solar System, one of 34 photos. Here, a view of the Sun on March 7, 2012, seen in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Looping lines reveal solar plasma that is rising and falling along magnetic field lines in the solar atmosphere, or corona. The brighter prominence at upper left is named solar active region 1429, which has already released several large solar flares, some accompanied by large explosions of solar plasma known as coronal mass ejections. (NASA/SDO)

In Focus, our news photography blog, is on Tumblr. Instafollow!